y-a-n-d-e-r-e:

drawing in class is such a religious experience

y-a-n-d-e-r-e:

drawing in class is such a religious experience

Lab cancelled due to high low tides so now it’s a beach day #getonmylevel

Lab cancelled due to high low tides so now it’s a beach day #getonmylevel

My lab location for today. #fuckyeahbiology #ilovemymajor

My lab location for today. #fuckyeahbiology #ilovemymajor

There are the green-eyed Mexicans. The rich blond Mexicans. The Mexicans with the faces of Arab sheiks. The Jewish Mexicans. The big-footed-as-a-German Mexicans. The leftover-French Mexicans. The chaparrito compact Mexicans. The Tarahumara tall-as-a-desert-saguaro Mexicans. The Mediterranean Mexicans. The Mexicans w/Tunisian eyebrows. The negrito Mexicans of the double coasts. The Chinese Mexicans. The curly-haired, freckled-faced, red-headed Mexicans. The Lebanese Mexicans. Look, I don’t know what you’re talking about when you say I don’t look Mexican. I am Mexican.

Source: Sandra Cisneros (via ioanina)

ernbarassing:

*suddenly remembers all of life’s responsibilities on sunday night*

(Source: ernbarassing)

(Source: jockbf)

currentsinbiology:

Mitochondria may have once been energy parasites

"We believe this study has the potential to change the way we think about the event that led to mitochondria," said U.Va. biologist Martin Wu, the study’s lead author. "We are saying that the current theories — all claiming that the relationship between the bacteria and the host cell at the very beginning of the symbiosis was mutually beneficial — are likely wrong.
"Instead, we believe the relationship likely was antagonistic — that the bacteria were parasitic and only later became beneficial to the host cell by switching the direction of the ATP transport."

Zhang Wang, Martin Wu. Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite. PLOS ONE, 2014 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110685

currentsinbiology:

Mitochondria may have once been energy parasites

"We believe this study has the potential to change the way we think about the event that led to mitochondria," said U.Va. biologist Martin Wu, the study’s lead author. "We are saying that the current theories — all claiming that the relationship between the bacteria and the host cell at the very beginning of the symbiosis was mutually beneficial — are likely wrong.

"Instead, we believe the relationship likely was antagonistic — that the bacteria were parasitic and only later became beneficial to the host cell by switching the direction of the ATP transport."

Zhang Wang, Martin Wu. Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite. PLOS ONE, 2014 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110685